Category: Exhibitions

A New London Show Will Reveal the Painter Jusepe de Ribera as a Master of Violence. Was He Also a Murderer?

Naples was a dangerous place to be in the 17th century, and it was no different for the brilliant artists who toiled in the Mediterranean city—in fact, they weren’t even safe from their illustrious peers. When Domenichino died in mysterious...

/ August 10, 2018

From Nick Cave to Janelle Monáe, Kansas City’s New Biennial Mingles Art and Music for a Midwestern Extravaganza

Open Spaces Kansas City, the Midwestern art biennial announced in November, touches down in venues all over the city on August 25, kicking off a nine-week celebration of the country’s self-proclaimed “Creative Crossroads.” The city-wide exhibition encompasses parks, urban spaces,...

/ August 9, 2018

Christo Will Personally Pay to Deep-Clean London’s Serpentine Lake After His Mastaba Sculpture Is Removed

Christo and the late Jeanne Claude’s monumental floating sculpture, The London Mastaba, is a gift that will keep on giving, apparently. After the pyramid-like work of art—made of more than 7,500 oil barrels—comes down, the artist is funding a range...

/ August 7, 2018

Accio Calendar! The 9 Most Magical Events Taking Place for New York’s Sure-to-Be-Blockbuster Harry Potter Exhibition

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the US publication of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, and the New-York Historical Society is celebrating in a big way. On Tuesday, July 31, the title character’s birthday, the museum announced a...

/ August 3, 2018

What Do Brancusi, Leonardo, and Pamela Anderson Have in Common? They’re All Vegetarians Who Appear in These Artist-Designed Plates for Animal Lovers

The British artist Benedict Hughes has made a series of painted plates that celebrate vegetarians and vegans down the ages. The work was inspired by Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant’s The Famous Women Dinner Service, which the Bloomsbury artists created...

/ August 1, 2018

What if Monty Python’s Black Knight Were Pink? At the British Library, Unseen Sketches From the Comedy Reveal What Might Have Been

The British Library will display never-before-seen sketches from Monty Python, the beloved British comedy. The unrealized scripts are from the archives of group member Michael Palin, which also include diaries, photographs, ephemera, early drafts of the hit films Monty Python...

/ August 1, 2018

How Collector Stefan Simchowitz Transformed a Defunct Newsstand Into LA’s Newest Art Space

Is this the art-world equivalent of turning lemons into lemonade? Controversial art collector Stefan Simchowitz has transformed one of his favorite former local spots—a newsstand in West Hollywood that fell victim to the broader demise of the print industry—into a...

/ July 31, 2018

Andy Warhol’s Epic ‘Shadows’ Will Be Shown in New York City for the First Time in 20 Years

New Yorkers are getting a double dose of Andy Warhol this fall. In addition to the Pop art icon’s highly anticipated retrospective at New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art, the Dia Art Foundation is planning an ambitious reunion of Warhol’s...

/ July 30, 2018

The Louvre’s Critically Acclaimed Delacroix Show Gets a Record Attendance

A record half a million people went to the Louvre’s Eugène Delacroix blockbuster, which is headed to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the fall. The survey brings together 180 works that span the French painter’s career. With nearly 540,000 visitors,...

/ July 27, 2018

Artangel, London’s Wildly Ambitious Art Nonprofit, Raises More than $2 Million—and Taps a ‘Globally Renowned’ Artist For a Top-Secret Project

Artangel, the London-based nonprofit organization that commissions and produces ambitious site-specific artworks by significant artists, has raised  £2 milion ($2.5 million) so far to help future projects—thanks to the help of 37 grateful artists who contributed works to fuel the...

/ July 26, 2018

A New National Portrait Project Will Send 50 UK Artworks to the Cities and Towns That Gave Them Life

Many of the most-beloved British works of art in the National Portrait Gallery do not hail from London. Like the artists that created them or the subjects they depict, these works grew out of life in a range of cities and towns...

/ July 25, 2018

New Works and No Lines: How the Cleveland Museum of Art Is Changing the Way Visitors See Yayoi Kusama’s ‘Infinity Mirrors’

The Yayoi Kusama juggernaut is continuing its domination of North America as the octogenarian’s blockbuster show “Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirrors” opened at the Cleveland Museum of Art on July 7. But while visitors can expect the artist’s signature kaleidoscopic rooms to...

/ July 24, 2018

The Hong Kong Museum of Art Has Received a Major $480 Million Donation of Chinese Painting and Calligraphy

The Hong Kong Museum of Art has received an astonishing gift of more than 350 Chinese paintings and calligraphic works from the nonprofit foundation Chi Lo Lou Promotion, founded by the philanthropist and collector Ho lu Kwong, according to a Hong...

/ July 20, 2018

‘It Reminded Me of How We Started’: Why Kurimanzutto Is Bringing a Show About a Short-Lived 1960s Art Gallery to New York

Most summer gallery shows focus on presenting a broad swath of up-and-coming talent. But Kurimanzutto did something different: The Mexico City-based gallery traveled to London to present a tribute to a short-lived gallery that operated for two years in the...

/ July 20, 2018

The Woman Behind Iraq’s Pavilion in Venice Launches a New Initiative to Champion Artists From Conflict Zones

The Baghdad-based Ruya Foundation, best known for organizing Iraq’s pavilion at the Venice Biennale, is launching a new initiative. Called Ruya Maps, the project aims to support and show the work of artists who are largely “invisible” in the West because...

/ July 18, 2018

Who Said Art Was Fun? This Year’s Liverpool Biennial Is a Tearjerking Journey Through Europe’s Dark, Violent Past

An overwhelming spirit of retrospection—rather than nostalgia—permeates the 10th edition of the Liverpool Biennial, the UK’s largest visual art festival. For an exhibition with the title, “Beautiful world, where are you?” this was perhaps inevitable. But rather than a wistful...

/ July 17, 2018

‘We Can All Be in Different Worlds’: Ralph Rugoff’s Venice Biennale Will Respond to the Rise of Fake News

Ralph Rugoff, the artistic director of the 58th Venice Biennale, has revealed the title for his marquee exhibition due to open next May: “May You Live in Interesting Times.” The phrase, which has been referenced by Western politicians and rhetoricians...

/ July 16, 2018

Michelangelo Mania Rocketed the Metropolitan Museum of Art to Break Its Record for Annual Attendance

Some good news from the Metropolitan Museum of Art after ups and downs with senior management and budgetary woes: Today the storied New York museum announced attendance of 7.35 million visitors in its fiscal year ended June 30. The number represents...

/ July 5, 2018

Richard Wilson Will Fill the Hayward Gallery With Thousands of Gallons of Oil to Reprise His Most Famous Work This Fall

One of London’s most memorable contemporary art installations is returning to the capital. The work—Richard Wilson’s most famous installation, which involves flooding a room with gallons of reflective engine oil—returns some three decades after its debut in the city. Wilson...

/ July 5, 2018

Here Are the Top 5 Highlights of Frieze Sculpture 2018

John Baldessari’s big Penguin is stopping joggers in their tracks in Regent’s Park. It looks as if it’s strayed from the nearby London Zoo. The “self-portrait” measures the exact height of the veteran artist, and the big bird is but one of...

/ July 4, 2018

Did René Magritte Change His Surrealist Style to Avoid Nazi Persecution? See the Evidence Here

Even if you haven’t visited a museum in a few years, the odds are good that you’ve come across one of René Magritte‘s conceptually winking artworks recently. They pop up everywhere, from dorm-room posters to mugs to tote bags. But...

/ July 4, 2018