Category: Global

Why Swedes are inserting microchips into their bodies

ON SOME Swedish trains, passengers carry their e-tickets in their hands—literally. About 3,000 Swedes have opted to insert grain-of-rice-sized microchips beneath the skin between their thumbs and index fingers. The chips, which cost around $150, can hold personal details, credit-card...

/ August 2, 2018

Cheer up, Deutschland

A VISITOR to Germany this summer will find a country living well. Gentle chit-chat and the clink of glasses murmur from sun-dappled beer gardens. Barges laden with exports chug up the Rhine. Prosperous vacationers travel to lakes and seaside resorts...

/ August 2, 2018

Politics surpasses satire in Ukraine

ONE morning a history teacher wakes up in Kiev to find himself elected president of Ukraine—thanks to a video secretly recorded by a pupil and uploaded to YouTube. It shows the teacher cursing Ukraine’s political class for their lies and...

/ August 2, 2018

The world relies on Russia to build its nuclear power plants

IN MARCH 2011 a tsunami engulfed the Fukushima power plant in Japan, ultimately causing a meltdown. The worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, it was a devastating blow to an industry that has been in the doldrums since the 1980s. Nuclear...

/ August 2, 2018

Countries team up to save the liberal order from Donald Trump

FOR the past four years senior officials from a group of leading democracies, calling themselves the “D10”, have quietly been meeting once or twice a year to discuss how to co-ordinate strategies to advance the liberal world order. Foreign ministry...

/ August 2, 2018

‘That’s It, We’re Dead’: Questions of Accountability After Tragedy in the Alps

August 02, 2018  05:33 PM At 5 a.m. on April 29, 2018, Lisa Hagen awakes in a mountain lodge 2,928 meters (9,606 feet) above sea level. She slept poorly and can't stop thinking about the weather. She creeps out of...

/ August 2, 2018

How will Imran Khan govern?

A WEEK after a general election rocked by suspicions of fraud, the dust is beginning to settle. It looks all but certain that Imran Khan, a former captain of Pakistan’s cricket team, will be sworn in as the country’s next...

/ August 2, 2018

Why the mayor of Seoul sleeps in a shack

“MY WIFE can barely contain her happiness,” Park Won-soon, the mayor of Seoul, South Korea’s capital, wrote on his Facebook page on July 27th. The occasion for her ecstasy was that an electric fan had arrived in the household. In...

/ August 2, 2018

A controversial register of citizens in north-east India

GIVEN the problem, it seemed a reasonable solution. The north-eastern state of Assam is among the most ethnically, linguistically, religiously and topographically mixed bits of India. It is also the most combustible. In the 1970s and 1980s thousands died in...

/ August 2, 2018

Japan’s habits of overwork are hard to change

YOSHIHISA AONO could be a model for Japanese executives. The offices of Cybozu, his software company, would appear staid were they in Palo Alto. But they are radical for central Tokyo, where each day waves of black-suited Stakhanovites make their...

/ August 2, 2018

A bombing in the Philippines tells peacemakers to make haste

IT DID not take long for Islamic State (IS) to claim responsibility for a bomb on the island of Basilan, part of the southern region of Mindanao in the Philippines, that killed nine soldiers and civilian bystanders, along with the...

/ August 2, 2018

US campaign industry publication names Zagoritis a ‘Rising Star’

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn US trade magazine Campaigns and Elections has named Jerry Zagoritis, the founder and managing director of campaignLAB, a startup that mixes behavioural science with advanced targeting to craft...

/ August 2, 2018

IMF remains sceptical about Greece’s long-term debt sustainability

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Google+ Share on LinkedIn Despite several rounds of bailouts that have helped stabilise Greece’s massive public debt, the International Monetary Fund said in a report released on July 31 that optimistic projections...

/ August 2, 2018

Untangling the left’s Nixon debates

CYNTHIA NIXON’S Democratic Party primary campaign against despised New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is generating enthusiasm and intense discussion on the left. After weeks of debate, the Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) in New York endorsed her campaign last weekend....

/ August 2, 2018

Let them eat data

VIRGINIA EUBANKS has written an important new book, Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police and Punish the Poor, that describes the development of technology to update regulatory systems long used under capitalism to punish poor people under the guise...

/ August 2, 2018

Independent inside the Democrats?

Independence from the Democrats Is the Way to Go Nate Moore | Open democratic socialist candidates running for office and challenging establishment candidates in the Democratic Party is different from earlier challenges like those of Jesse Jackson in the 1980s...

/ August 2, 2018

Berkeley’s emergency powers to profile

WITH THE far right planning to return to Berkeley’s streets on August 5 — and with anti-racists organizing to counter their message of hate and violence — the City Council voted overwhelmingly on July 31 to give the Berkeley City...

/ August 2, 2018

A truck bomb in the Philippines tells peacemakers to make haste

IT DID not take long for Islamic State (IS) to claim responsibility for a bomb on the island of Basilan, part of the southern region of Mindanao in the Philippines, that killed nine soldiers and civilian bystanders, along with the...

/ August 1, 2018

Man of the People Donald Trump Thinks You Need an I.D. to Buy Groceries

Champion of the working man. By Evan Vucci/AP/REX/Shutterstock. When The New York Times reported in 1992 that elitist George H.W. Bush was “amazed” by the “technology” of grocery-store scanners, the anecdote took on a life of its own, eventually—some say—contributing...

/ August 1, 2018